HypOxygen's Blog - Latest News from HypOxygen

World Heart Day 2017

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, is responsible for approx. 1 in 3 deaths in the US, according to the American Heart Association. World Heart Day on September 29th serves as a platform to educate people on how to take control of their heart health.

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death

Of all the “Hallmarks of Cancer” defined by Hanahan and Weinberg, the ability to proliferate indefinitely is often considered to be the most central to cancer’s core features. Sustaining Growth and Resisting Cell Death enable cancer cells to override signaling that ensures normal tissues’ homeostasis of numbers and size. Previous chapters in our mini-series on “Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer” have showcased Avoiding Immune Destruction and Tumor Promoting Inflammation and Genome Instability and Mutation and Enabling Replicative Immortality as well as Inducing Angiogenesis and Activating Invasion and Metastasis.

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Angiogenesis and Metastasis

Hanahan and Weinberg’s “Hallmarks of Cancer” are at the root of the multi-step progression of cancer, and they are all influenced by hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment. In this mini-review series, HypOxygen has been taking a closer look at the way HypOxystation users worldwide are delineating the effects of hypoxia on the Hallmarks of Cancer: so far, we’ve showcased Avoiding Immune Destruction and Tumor Promoting Inflammation and Genome Instability and Mutation and Enabling Replicative Immortality.  

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Genome Instability and Immortality

HypOxygen continues to look at the way the iconic “Hallmarks of Cancer”, as first described by Douglas Hanahan and Robert Weinberg, are influenced by hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment. Oxygen around and within the tumor cells is central to metabolism, immunology, epigenetics and therapy resistance of all the cancers; in the lab, oxygen levels during tumor cell culture exert effects on metabolism, maintenance, cell yield, and cell survival. 

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Hypoxia and the Hallmarks of Cancer: Inflammation and Immunity

The iconic “Hallmarks of Cancer” first described by Douglas Hanahan and Robert Weinberg in 2000 continue to develop explosively as efforts to illuminate the “acquired capabilities of cancer” evolve. Hypoxia in the fast-growing, poorly perfused tumor setting is one of the main factors selecting for survival of cancer cells and driving mutagenesis and metastasis. Oxygen in the tumor microenvironment and within the cells is central to metabolism, immunology, epigenetics and therapy resistance of all the cancers.  

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Don Whitley Visits The Francis Crick Institute

DWSCrickDr Don Whitley, chairman and founder of DWS, recently visited The Francis Crick Institute in London to see the recently installed Whiltley H45 Hypoxystation at the site. 

The Crick has moved into a brand new state-of-the-art building in the centre of London. Situated next to Kings Cross and St Pancreas stations, The Crick brings together 1500 scientists and staff working collaboratively in the biggest biomedical research facility under one roof in Europe. The work at The Crick covers many disciplines and applications in biomedical research, all with the aim of improving understanding of human health and disease. 

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